EBRC Gear Now Available through Land’s End

Now through Dec 7th (this coming Friday) you can go to our EBRC Land’s End team website and order team gear for 25% off plus free shipping. Tell those that are looking for that elusive gift to go shop now. Use the code WE25FS at checkout. After the 7th and through January 25,2013 our team has been offered free logo embroidery. For that offer, use code LOGO012 at checkout. Land’s End products are guaranteed. If you have any questions during the ordering process, call Land’s End.


EBRC has Strong Inaugural Showing at Head of the Charles Regatta

HOCR2012 EBRC - Women's 4+

East Bay Rowing Club made a very strong showing its first year at the Head of the Charles Regatta! Demonstrating the power and the potential of the club, two of the three boats entered through HOCR’s lottery system will be automatically entered into next year’s regatta based on their 2012 performance.

The women raced Saturday morning in the Women’s Senior Masters 4+ event, led by Pauline Velez in stroke seat. Passing a boat in the second mile of the course between the Weeks and Anderson bridges, the four finished 10th of 28 in an extremely competitive row. Congratulations to Pauline (4), Annie Mudge (3), Lisa Warhuus (2), Frederika Horton (1), and Elizabeth “Biz” Bernal (c) for such a fine showing!


Next up on the water for EBRC was the Men’s Masters 4+ in the early afternoon. Despite erratic winds, a mostly novice crew, and a broken collar on Luke Olona’s oar in stroke seat (which only became worse as the race wore on), the guys passed three boats through the course, finishing 11th out of 22 entries. Gina Gozinsky, coxing Head of the Charles for the first time, has definitely earned her merit badge. No one was as prepared for this course as she was, and it showed. Luke (4), Chris Groves (3), Devin Kelley (2), Charlie Noyes (1) and Gina (c) are thrilled with their results, and are already missing the balmy Cambridge weather.

EBRC’s final entry, the Men’s Master’s 8, followed after the Men’s 4+ in the afternoon as the sun came out and temperatures rose into the mid-70’s. Although they were passed early on by the 1st and 3rd place boats, the men held off all other boats with a clean row to the finish line in 18 minutes 30 seconds. Led by stellar coxswain Cait Hart from Austin, TX, the stroke pair of Paul Norberg (8) and Gil Gazda (7) set the pace at a 30-31 SPM over the 5K course, with rowers Ken Lutz (6), Luke Hunter (5), Steve Clark (4), Paul White (3), Nick Cawthon (2) and Jim Gotch (1) driving strong across the finish line and leaving it all out on the water.

HOCR, 2013, here we come!





East Bay Rowing at the 2012 Head of the Charles Regatta

EBRC men’s and women’s crews are headed to the 48th Head of the Charles
Regatta in Boston the weekend of October 20th & 21st! EBRC will join an
international field of competitors for the first time at this legendary event, and the
excitement in the boathouse is palpable.

Needless to say, competition for seats in the Men’s 4+, Men’s 8, and Women’s
4+ was fierce, and all of the EBRC athletes put forth their best efforts as the
coaches put them through their paces for weeks worth of erg testing and seat
racing.

Congratulations to: Pauline Velez, Annie Mudge, Lisa Warhuus and Fredrika
Horton – Women’s Senior Master 4+ (50+), and to Luke Ohlona, Chris Groves,
Devin Kelly, Charlie Noyes – Men’s Masters 4 (40+), Paul Norberg Gil Gazda,
Luke Hunter, Nick Cawthon, Steve Clark, Paul White, Ken Lutz, and Jim Gotch
– Men’s Masters 8 (40+), for driving hard and making the cut. The entire EBRC
team is incredibly proud of you!

Since its origin in 1965, the Head Of The Charles Regatta has welcomed the
world’s best crews to the banks of the Charles River for the ultimate two-day
rowing competition. The race, named the “Head” of the Charles because of its
distance of 5k/3.2 miles, is the largest 2-day regatta in the world, with nearly
9,000 athletes rowing in over 1,900 boats in 61 events, and attracting roughly
300,000 spectators during regatta weekend. This year the 2012 HOCR will
welcome crews from 28 nations, 37 states, 383 cities, and 705 clubs – a new
record.

The 3.2 mile long course stretches from the start at Boston University’s DeWolfe
Boathouse near the Charles River Basin to the finish just after the Eliot Bridge,
and is renowned for the river’s challenging bends and bridges. Coxswains must
safely steer their crews under 6 bridges with the Weeks and Eliot Bridges falling
at sharp turns in the course, often resulting in collisions and near misses. Good
luck to all the rowers and to women’s team member, Gina Gozinsky, who will
participate in her first Head of the Charles Regatta as coxswain of the men’s 4+.
Watch out for those bridges, Gina!

The remaining Oakland-based members of the EBRC team will gather in the
JLAC boathouse on the 20th to support the racers with an erg test and will stay

to watch the webcast of the race on the big screen! Come down and join us to
show your support as East Bay Rowing Club (and the city of Oakland) makes its
mark!


These Ducks Have Crew Grit

Despite our Cal and WaSU laden teams here at the EBRC, it’s great to see these Oregon Ducks crushing it on the Willamette. They admit that just because they’re not the biggest boat in the race, they’re not going to give up on their teammates and let the boat down. As my own University of Oregon experience was 15 years ago, hopping on a city bus at 5:00am, to go up to a frigid reservoir for practice is still hard core.

[youtube height=”305″ width=”520″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1dgyY4RL2A&feature=youtu.be[/youtube]

This video is a great introduction to how the boat breaks down from stern to bow, where the power, technique and pace come from within the boat. It’s interesting watching the team warm-up, prepare and race at the 2012 Western Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships. The cox-eye view of the race itself pumps me up, really is a great testament to the intensity needed to race, both as a cox and a rower.

Even at our practice, our cox had recorded their instructions to the boat for some small boat races one morning. It was such a testament to their craft, that they’d go back and review a recording of their own barking to see what made sense as instructional advice in the middle of a workout. It reminded me a bit of this documentary, a crew of constant improvement, trying to get better.

As a former duck crewbie, I can be proud of this documentary… but what’s with all the bird chirping?


Oxford vs. Cambridge Boat Race 2012

Great replay of the 158th annual Oxford vs. Cambridge Boat Race from earlier this year. Each turn in this long, 6.8k race is worth more than a length of a boat. One boat pushes the other to the bank, trying to edge them off the line and open a gap for a push. This looks like a nightmare race to cox. The headwinds are brutal, the whitecaps are present, and the course looks as loopy as a soccer hooligan.

The character of the two boats was really prevelant – Cambridge were expected to be the sprinters out of the block, with Oxford being the longer marathoners trying to hold off as long as possible. And oh, what the drama on the Chiswick Eyot with oars littering the Thames after a controversial interruption.

I love the commentary from the BBC crew, quoting approach of the Surrey Bend, Hammersmith Bridge and Harrod’s Depository. A majority of this race is within a single length of each other, until the incidents begin to occur. The deepest water is the fastest stream. Yes, sensi, for there I will steer.


Backwards : The Movie

Stop the presses – there’s a new movie about rowing! Relive all of your most self-conscious moments about getting swapped during seat races or the weigh-in. Remember the internal drama and angst between rower and coach after a hard prescribed land workout. Watch your split times go higher that James Van Der Beek’s hairline. Just the sounds of the horn and whoosh of the stroke in Dobly Surround sound makes this movie get two thumbs up in EBRC’s book. When it comes to teenage rowing dramas, Backwards : The Movie is leading the regatta right up Dawson’s Creek. I only hope that this Hollywood rowing trend keeps up, as Danny Devito needs to rejuvenate his career in the coxswain’s seat of the next blockbuster.


Learn to Row Day : July 21st @ JLAC

East Bay Rowing Club is hosting opened its doors to the public on National Learn to Row Day, Saturday, July 21st, 2012. Visitors toured the boathouse, got a crash course in indoor rowing (erging), along with the basics of the rowing stroke and a brief overview of the equipment used and programs offered at East Bay Rowing Club. Despite the somewhat windy conditions, visitors got out on the water with a quick trip out into the estuary in an “eight” with an experienced coxswain and rowers to guide them. Looking forward to our next event in January.


Maggie Grover

At-Large Representative


Sara Nevin

Sara Nevin started advising and part-time coaching EBRC in December 2013. She’s been instrumental in getting the EBRC Learn To Row programs running strong, sharing her love of rowing with those who’ve never seen the inside of a racing shell. Sara became head coach for the Mills Cyclones in 2011; before Mills, Sara spent 10 years as Assistant Coach for the Cal Golden Bears. At Cal, Nevin led the varsity 4 through an undefeated season to win NCAA championships in 2011. She also led the novice crew to multiple top finishes at the Pac-10 Championships. The Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association (CRCA) acknowledged Nevin’s ability and success by naming her the 2008 CRCA Assistant Coach of the Year as well as the 2008 CRCA West Region Assistant Coach of the Year.

Before coaching at UC Berkeley, Nevin served as the executive director and head coach at the Lake Lanier Rowing Club in Gainesville, Ga. During her five years in Georgia, Nevin coached all levels of rowers from beginners to U.S. national team members. In addition to her coaching, Nevin acted as the full-time boathouse and rowing club director, as well as Regatta Director for the NCAA Women’s Rowing Championships in 1998 and 2001. Before arriving at Lake Lanier, Nevin spent seven years coaching in Seattle, Washington. Between 1989–92, Nevin coached at the Seattle Training Center, coaching a group of elite and pre-elite rowers. Her stint culminated with all eight women earning spots on the 1992 Olympic team.

From 1990–96, Nevin also coached the varsity boys rowing team at the Mount Baker Rowing Club. There, Nevin grew a program of 16 athletes to over 50 and won four USRowing Junior National Championships, including the school-boys’ eight in 1991 and 1993. Nevin earned a BA in political science with a minor in pre-medicine from the University of Washington in 1985. During her rowing career at UW, Nevin won three varsity 8 national championships between 1983–85 and was undefeated in U.S. collegiate competition. She was a member of the U.S. national team in 1985 and 1986.


Jess LaFrank

Jess LaFrank began coaching in the fall of 2011 after graduating from Mills College. At Mills, Jess was a a four-year coxswain and an asset in maintaining cohesion within the team, as three different head coaches led the rowing program. Senior varsity coxswain for three of her four years, she was awarded the peer-elected Cyclone Award in 2008, 2010, and 2011 for exemplary effort, attitude, and actions in support of the team; she also received the Coaches Award in 2008.

With a double major in poetry and psychology, Jess earned the Scholar-Athlete award each of her four years at Mills while enrolled full time, living off campus, and working various jobs to help pay for tuition and expenses. Before Mills, Jess did not participate in athletics; it was at Mills she found a love for sport, competition, and teamwork. As an alum, she enjoys working with students at Mills discover the ample opportunities there are to participate in athletics, and raising the competitive standard of Mills athletics has been, in a word, rewarding.